Native and transgenic cuisine

pacojetOn social media, exordiums of sustainability, traditions, popular culture, and the preservation of the indigenous are abundant. The allegations against consumerism, transgenic investigation, and modernity in general are applauded without looking twice. Stewpots are sighed upon and the Pacojet is cursed upon. What matters, apparently, is the means and not the depth. This academic Marcusianism forgets, however, that the value of the autochthonous has its foundation in the modernity that created it and that what is presently modern will become autochthonous when the future becomes present. It forgets as well that cooking really resides in feeding before delighting oneself, and that if the means matters to he frivolous, then welcome be however many new joys modernity can procure us. The native, in many cases, is suffering from Malta fever from consuming natural lactose products or getting sick from legionella because conservatives weren’t added.

In any case, the hotel industry distracts itself in the subjunctive fantasy of spikes, threshing board tables or medieval armors—the form— without worrying about the truly important things like sleeping, dreaming, getting excited or living a unique experience —the depth—. Because the autochthonous in architecture could easily be the floor, the nothing, before the homo was habilis and chose the modernity of a cave. Or, what tradition are we speaking of? Continue reading