A genius is unique and chaotic, not perfect or a winner

shirtwhiteI am very grateful to Orlando Cotado, ideologist and promotor of Incitus Awards, by these words addressed to me on his blog. For sure, the title is deafening, but its content redeems.

This past Friday at the organized lectures by the Incitus Movement, as a complement to their dynamic work in the hostelry sector, I had the luck to meet and learn about the convoluted speculations of Fernando Gallardo (@fgallardo). A character who has seen a lot, lived a lot, and I’m not saying that because of his age because I consider him infinitely younger than I, but above all, and I think this is his greatest virtue, because he has thought a lot.

As if that wasn’t enough, a friend and no less brilliant Luis Veira, chef of Árbore da Veira restaurant and one of the Michelin Stars with the biggest future in the Galician gastronomic scene, also accompanied us. The grace of the event was in the contrast of opinions and experiences.

A common characteristic of quick and privileged minds is the slowness with which they communicated —Adrià is the exception that proves it—. Gallardo is a calm and light person, but with content even in his pauses. A guy who is able to place all his cards face up, yet still hide his game. A great guy, provocative and generous as all those of his species. A guide that is going one small step ahead.

After a pretentious examination of perceptions to which he was playing with an advantage —throwing zooms and perverse angles of vision to hide from us the table of Zaha Hadid and the famous shower of his Inhabited Ruin— he concluded that what prevented us from being different, the barrier between the old and the modern, that which turned us into a gray plain, was protocols.

Protocol, a rule or guide with enough information to prevent creativity. That which tells us that a table must have four legs, a telephone keys with numbers or a car a steering wheel. Fortunately, there’s geniuses like Hadid, Jobs, or Google’s engineers that don’t let themselves be closeted in by these protocols.

As a trend analyst, his mission is to open doors and show us new and trending worlds. However, their biggest virtue is surrounding information and their bold approaches. His bet for collaborative economic is known by all —I like to think that that’s where his support to the Incitus Movement comes from— and his tough defense of Uber. In his lecture, he condemned success as a fight to be the best to other’s detriment. Gallardo imagines a society where we strive to be different, not better. «Watch differently, be unique» —he concluded.

This was the message of the entrepreneurs of the room, a message that, not by overuse, has lost its sense. The «Think Different» of Jobs and Apple is more present than ever. Because, no matter how much we repeat it, we don’t come to grips with accepting it. «Creativity is not copying» Adrià repeats hastily. Very simple, but very complicated to execute. Although Gallardo also left us without any clue in that subject.

«When I bought what today is The Inhabited Ruin, I hired the best architect in rustic European home rehabilitation. He delivered the best project I could hope for, the best. Everything was right, but I didn’t like it and I didn’t know how to express why. Until a year later, we visited the ruin and I realized it. I had the project I hoped for, everything that imagination and talent could perpetrate, but something was missing, a surprise element that would make it different. It was missing madness, it was missing chaos, it was missing being unique» —he confessed.

And this is the path. Add chaos to your routine and «become an entrepreneur only if you are capable of creating unique things». A genius is unique and chaotic, not perfect or a winner.

Continue reading

Embracing Beauty

fibonacci

I had the pleasure of speaking with Enrique Loewe about beauty and ugliness in the solemn courtyard of the new Thyssen Museum, Málaga. “Embrace beauty”, he exclaimed from the podium of someone who symbolizes luxury better than anyone else in Spain. “Whatever you may study, whatever you may do, be sensible to the ideal of beauty that will transform your professions into a happy and creative exercise. Be demanding with your surroundings, proclaim your taste for things well done, hold on to what’s beautiful,” concluded he who in his own words “has given everything for the desire of beauty in design”.

The esthetics canon has been in constant evolution through History. While the women of the Renaissance portrayed wide hips and prominent curves, women in the 18th century quite contrarily sought to accentuate fragility which was considered romantic by taking only vinegar and lemon. Or what about the incomprehensible esthetics, to us, that are the giraffe women of the Karen tribe in Thailand. Or the teeth blackened with the ohaguru technique in Japan. While Japanese culture demands pale and milky faces, the European middle class has imposed a tanned sheen achieved after many hours of sun exposure in the Mediterranean beaches. Since classic times the concept of beauty had been associated with the discovery of the divine proportion, the number phi, enunciated by Pythagoras and other Hellenic mathematicians. Symmetry isn’t found in parity, but in the spiral evolution of the shapes based on 1618. For each unit, you add to the line a little over a unit and a half. This Fibonacci succession is recognized as much in the works of nature as in the work of artistic geniuses: Praxiteles, Da Vinci, Palladio, Le Corbusier. Continue reading