Blacklists of conflicting clients

Blacklists of conflicting clientsAfter the controversy over false reviews on sites like TripAdvisor, I have held a debate about the blacklists that several tourism platforms have created over conflicting guests. This initiative, which allows subscribers to view the list of problematicpassengers, may affect the right to honor or freedom of expression in the words of some shysters. The Spanish economic newspaper Expansion has just published a reference I want to comment on here. Not from the law perspective, but from common sense that marks every principle of reciprocity.

According to the Charter of the United Nations, the signing states apply and develop the right to free expression – an inalienable right of every person to communicate what they think and how they think it. This right prevails in some countries like the United States, even on top of other constitutional rights such as honor, privacy and self-image. So much so that successive actions against TripAdvisor have not matched punitive judgments by the courts, except in exceptional cases.  Continue reading

Google Opens a New Door to Tourism

Google is a technological and cultural freshness in the antipodes of the tourism “experts” and their undecipherable jargon

Google began selling its digital glasses in the United States, although access has been limited for now to the category (mass) of the “explorers” or early adopters as they are known in marketing speak. They’re probably not as comfortable as those of us who have already tried them had expected, nor as functional nor as ultra-sensitive. But they most certainly open the door to better futures, and especially, to a new digital era coined with the IoT brand, Internet of Things.

I’m convinced that Google, whose New York offices I was able to visit recently like someone who snoops at the Pentagon, has also been called on to be a front-and-center player in the tourism industry of the future. The glasses will enable up-and-coming generations to record their purchases on Fifth Avenue and the panoramic view shots de rigueur from the observation deck of the Empire State Building. First it will be through that monstrous contraption holding a prism that is hardly adaptable to graduated optics and its delicate frames. Later with graphene nanotubes inserted in microscopically thin contact lenses. Finally with organic brain impulse readers like the ones emitted by our eyes’ optic nerve. Their detractors will not have time to react: the glasses disturbing their intimacy will be invisible. Continue reading