Room of the Valkyries

valquirias

Since The Lord of the Rings trylogy, of which its first part was directed by Peter Jackson, tourism in New Zealand has not stopped growing exponentially. The national tourism authority would never have dreamed such an avalanche of foreigners would come with the premiere of the adventures of Frodo, Gandalf, Bilbo, Gollum and Aragorn, despite spending millions of NZ dollars on promotion. Just one film, only one impression, was good enough to entice us with those dreamscapes we enjoy now and forever.

The same feeling came to us some decades ago with the vision of 2001: A Space Odyssey. When the master Stanley Kubrick took us into science fiction ecstasy, we ran to Copenhagen for a few days to seeing with our own eyes the white, pristine, hotel lobby SAS, designed by the great architect Arne Jacobsen for the final chapter of the Continue reading

Native and transgenic cuisine

pacojetOn social media, exordiums of sustainability, traditions, popular culture, and the preservation of the indigenous are abundant. The allegations against consumerism, transgenic investigation, and modernity in general are applauded without looking twice. Stewpots are sighed upon and the Pacojet is cursed upon. What matters, apparently, is the means and not the depth. This academic Marcusianism forgets, however, that the value of the autochthonous has its foundation in the modernity that created it and that what is presently modern will become autochthonous when the future becomes present. It forgets as well that cooking really resides in feeding before delighting oneself, and that if the means matters to he frivolous, then welcome be however many new joys modernity can procure us. The native, in many cases, is suffering from Malta fever from consuming natural lactose products or getting sick from legionella because conservatives weren’t added.

In any case, the hotel industry distracts itself in the subjunctive fantasy of spikes, threshing board tables or medieval armors—the form— without worrying about the truly important things like sleeping, dreaming, getting excited or living a unique experience —the depth—. Because the autochthonous in architecture could easily be the floor, the nothing, before the homo was habilis and chose the modernity of a cave. Or, what tradition are we speaking of? Continue reading