Big Data, the Next Challenge

La Provincia newspaper of Las Palmas interviewed me on the occasion of the Sixth Hotel Innovation Conference of “La Ruina Habitada” held from November 18 to 21, 2013 at Nautilus Lanzarote Hotel. 

Big Data is the next challenge of the tourism industry

How will customer Big Data analysis revolutionize tourism?

In the immediate future, there will be a change in attracting customers. There will be a difference between the traditional way of attracting a customer-colloquially, casting the fishing line-and how the customer is going to come in upcoming years. Big Data analytics will profoundly change distribution channels because the way of attracting customers will be precisely focused on knowing them. The more you know your customer, the more possibilities you will have to attract him or her to your business.

It will be a new challenge for the tourism industry.

You have to do a serious, costly, ambitious and very technological job of knowing the customer. The most foreseeable way is for this to be done through powerful Big Data analytics. Big Data will enable predictive models which, through tracking customer footprints, everyone and everything will be a sensor. It is predicted that there will be 212 billion connectors on the planet by the year 2020 that will be interrelated without cables through computers and data communication. In that ostentatious amount of data that are going to be managed, the management system will afford an unheard of knowledge of travelers’ movements thanks to data cross referencing. Distribution channels will gradually fall into the hands of purely technological companies that will be the only ones able to face enormous investments in developing Big Data analytics. Continue reading

Is Airbnb the next Booking?

Sharing hands for a sharing economy

At first, I thought that Airbnb was going to occupy a lodging niche that nobody wanted to, or could, digitally manage, given the dispersion of supply and the variety of behaviors attributed to homeowners interested in putting their homes up for rent by periods. But after a deep reflection on the strategic focus of the company, different view exchanges among tourism agents in New York (home of its founder, Brian Chesky), and the concerned monitoring of American hotel strategist Chip Conley, with whom I have exchanged some epistolary views on the subject, I confess that my current impression is radically different from the original. Airbnb wants to enter not only in the hotel market but in the entire value chain of the tourism business. And it wants to enter to transform the world of travel through the generation that will manage it in the coming decades: the so-called millennials. Continue reading